Find information to share

Here is helpful information you can share with friends, family members and coworkers about the importance of getting screened. Tell them about your experience and encourage them to get screened too.

Share these facts:

  • Men and women at average risk of colorectal cancer need to get screened starting at age 50 (45 for African Americans) even if they have no family history and feel healthy*. People at increased risk of colorectal cancer should talk to their doctor about when to begin screening, which test is right for them and how often to get tested.
  • Getting tested on-time can prevent colorectal cancer or find early forms of cancer that can be treated.
  • Most insurance plans cover all the cost of screening with no out-of-pocket costs such as co-pays or deductibles. Even without insurance, there are low cost, reliable options, including ones you can do at home.
  • Get screened, then, do what I’m doing: tell someone else.

 

Your story could save a life.

*The American Cancer Society now recommends screening beginning at age 45 for all average-risk adults.

Your Stories

I was advised to get screened for colorectal cancer when I turned 50 by my doctor. I told him I wanted to wait a while and decided to put it off until he asked me to do it again. Finally, after turning 55 and much prompting from my friend, I mentioned it to my doctor and he told me it was a smart thing to get done and he couldn’t believe I hadn’t done it already!

The experience turned out to be quite nice and the environment was very comfortable and inviting. This is such an easy procedure; it was as if I took a nap and woke up and it was over.

I can understand the hesitation to get screened, but it’s worth it and necessary in order for people to take preventive measures, as I did have a pre-cancer polyp. After a certain age, good health comes from being proactive.

I encourage others to talk to their doctor about their options and then share your experience with friends and family.

 Jenny Kluver – Roseburg


read more...