Screening options

There are a number of reliable screening options available to meet your patients’ needs and budgets. Each screening method is effective if done correctly and at recommended intervals, and new research shows that offering patients a choice of screening options increases their likelihood of being screened.

View a quick reference guide with recommend screening options and clinical considerations.

 

NOTE: Collecting sample during an in-office digital rectal exam (DRE) is strongly discouraged. DREs miss 95 percent of cases of advanced neoplasia, giving patients a false sense of reassurance. They can also produce a false positive result due to hemorrhoids or anal fissures. A stool sample collected at home is optimal for testing purposes.

 

Your Stories

People don’t talk about getting colonoscopies at the water cooler.

Last fall, my doctor suggested I undergo a colonoscopy. It’s typically first recommended when a person hits 50, which was my case. I had a colonoscopy in March, which seems fitting since March is National Colorectal Awareness Month. I decided to tell my story so others would get screened as well.

Colonoscopies aren’t something people usually discuss and many people tend to put it off because they’re unsure what it entails. Sending a long snakelike device through my backside never seemed very appealing to me, either.

I’m glad I went and had the procedure done. The peace of mind knowing there aren’t any potential problems down there is worth it. If you’re older than 50 or have a family history or are showing symptoms of colorectal cancer, you should consider it, too.

John Sowell – Roseburg


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