Insurance coverage information

Most insurance plans cover all the cost of screening with no out-of-pocket costs such as co-pays or deductibles. Even without insurance, there are low cost, reliable options, including ones you can do at home.

View available coverage for different health plans.

For those with little or no insurance

The Affordable Care Act expands access to insurance to everyone. To find out about your insurance options visit HealthCare.gov.

Below are local and national resources for patients who are diagnosed with colorectal cancer and need assistance paying for treatment:

  • The Figg Tree Foundation—Provides grants to help with medical expenses ranging from doctors visits to chemotherapy treatment (click on Grant Info)
  • Patient Advocate Foundation—The Colorectal CareLine provides one-time grants to patients who have been diagnosed with colorectal cancer and need help with transportation services associated with their care
  • BenefitsCheckUp, a Service of the National Council on Aging—Helps seniors access available benefits for health care and other needs
  • HealthWell Foundation—Helps pay for medications for patients who are underinsured
  • Oregon Primary Care Association—Provides a list of federally qualified health centers across Oregon (click on Find a Health Center)
  • Project Access Now—Coordinates a network of volunteer physicians and other health care providers, making it easier for them to donate medically necessary care to the low-income uninsured in our communities.
  • 211info.org — Connects people with health and social service organizations
  • Breast, Cervical, and Colon Health Program in Washington State provides free cancer screening and follow-up services to income- and screening-eligible adults. (Services are provided in Vancouver-area practices.

 

Other resources:

 

Your Stories

OHA_Deschutes_ 1 (Corne#21EI stay in pretty good shape, I try to eat the right foods. But you don’t know what’s in your colon until you look in there. At age 63, it was just time to get checked. They didn’t find any polyps; the doctor said to repeat the colonoscopy in five years. With colorectal cancer, if you get it early enough, you can take care of it. If you don’t, it’s too late…Black men in general don’t like to go to doctors and do that kind of personal stuff. If I can encourage more black men to get to the doctor, I want to do that.

Cornelius “Mac” McCormick, retired university administrator and track coach

Summit High School, Bend


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